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authentic, antique, iron beds circa 1800s
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For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Antique  beds, generally speaking, were feminine in design.
They were lighter and airier than their wooden counter part bed frames. So to try and pull in the male clientele that were more accustom the heavier looking wooden bed frames,  foundries started offering castings with a masculine theme. “Lion Head”castings were used by many of the small independently owned foundries to try and break the feminine gender barrier iron beds had created. Along with these masculine symbols, manufacturers also began to offer darker finishes in black and dark gold. These two things were successful in changing public opinion that Victorian antique iron beds were strictly  feminine in nature.

Another thing that seemed to attract more males was a larger size tubing that the traditional 1″ tubing being used. Larger 1 1/4″ thick wall tubing had a much more masculine look and feel and also required larger castings, giving a bed a bulkier more massive look, than the otherwise feminine beds being produced by the majority of the foundies. Animal heads were just one more thing the foundries used, to attract an otherwise dominant female household decision.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Matching Twin Size iron beds are about as scarce as any antique item you’ll come across. Matching twin size frames were more of a “luxury “, than they were utilitarian in nature. Most of the time the were in children’s rooms of upper middle class and affluent families. Traditionally if a family had more than one child, which most did, they would put them all in one double size  bed. Prior to growing up and beyond the width of a standard double size bed, 54″ wide, two or even three children could sleep width wise in the bed. When their height became more than the width, they would all have to turn to the length or move in to a separate bed. So to have your own twin size bed, was a real luxury…….. and to have a sibling in a bed right along side of yours was even more special.

So consequently foundries made far fewer twin size designs, and even fewer people ever bought a matching set for one room. That was usually only done in homes of rather affluent means. For a time in history when “practicality” was the catch phrase of the century, a pair of matching antique iron beds was far from being practical.

Matching twin size metal beds are one of the rarest of an most sought after beds on the market. If you ever find a pair…..buy them. Even if you don’t have a need for them. It’s like buying “gold” ……. it will only go up in value. The tangability and finite amount of antique iron beds that were made and still exist on the market, make them oe of, if not the best investment a person can make. A limited supply and finite number of an item insures against others controling the market value.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

Old Metal beds have always been something that helps create a particular feeling for the period. I’ve been selling metal beds to the entertainment community for over 25 years. One of the first feature movies I ever sold a iron bed for was the cowboy movie “Sliverado” with Kevin Kline, Danny Glover,  and a new unknown………Kevin Costner. We had five beds in that movie. Since that movie came out in 1985, I’ve sold hundreds of  beds for movies and TV alike. One of our most prominently displayed beds,in a feature , was in Mr. & Mrs. Smith with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie . The photo of that  bed was in this shot with Angelina. Selling beds for feature films and also TV productions, also opened up the celebrity clientele books. It was not uncommon for a production company to purchase a bed from me for a film and then once production and filming started and the bed got more and more exposure by people in the movie or working behind the cameras on the film, I would end up selling beds to numerous people working on the film. On the Mr. & Mrs. Smith movie I sold a total of six beds to people working on the film. On “Silverado”, I sold a bed to Kevin Costner and three other crew member’s.

Set decorators haverepeatedly told me how after the filming of a movie or TV production, the beds that were used, usally “disappear”. An I’ve heard others say that they, on ore than one instances, seen the beds they remember having been on the set of a movie, in the bedrooms of actors in that movie. A “perk” , you might say, of having celebrity.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56

For all of my Irish friends I bring you an antique iron bed with a true Irish heritage.
The headboard currently stands at 64″ and the footboard at 39 1/4″tall. It gets brass corner finials . The painted “finish” is actually the original one put on back in the mid 1800′s by the manufacturer.
The castings are beautifully detailed Irish “shamrocks”. I’ve never seen or even heard of a bed having these before getting this one. Having been in this business for close to 40 years and having seen and sold thousands of iron beds….. that’s a real testament to it’s rarity.

This happens to be one of the top three antique iron beds I’ve seen, in the 40 years of being in this business. As you’ll see from the photo?.. it’s not a bed for everyone, rather a select few.
It has quite a fun pedigree. I’ve actually known about it for over 10 years. A  ”picker”, in Colorado, that I’ve been doing business with for over 30 years told me about it, and that when he got his hands on it, he’d let me know. It’s a “one of a kind” that came out of the leading brothel in Grand Junction Colorado. People such as Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday who died right down the road in Glennwood Springs, were known to frequent the house this bed came out of. Who knows who may have slept in it. But it was from back in the mid 1800′s. When the wild west was still actually considered wild.
The width, between the side rails,  is the standard 54″. But the outer curve, the likes of which I’ve never seen this large and pronounced, on any bed in the forty years I’ve been in this business, is 68″ wide….unheard of. The headboard is 6′ tall. I’ve never had a bed this impressive. The brass is beautifully integrated in to the overall design. Truly a “one of a kind”………….

No………Lincoln DID NOT sleep in this bed.

But consider this

On the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated
those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known Presidents in American history delivered what would be known as “The Gettysburg Address”.
His carefully crafted address, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history, and lasted just over two minutes.
So what, you ask, could this old antique iron bed have to do with such an historic day in our history. First…….We came across this bed in Gettysburg, Pa. It came from an elderly gentleman who’s family had lived all their lives in Gettysburg. Going back generations to the early 1800’s. He said that the bed had always been in his family and had been handed down from generation to generation. He remembered it being in his grandfathers house when he was a small child.
So once again…….consider this. The bed that you’re looking at…… was actually being used in a home, on the day President Lincoln delivered one of, if not the, most famous speech in our history. Nice to put in perspective the age of these old iron beauties and what our country was going through when they were being used.

The three leaf Clover, symbolizing Irish pride, was coined by St. Patrick to represent the Holy Trinity. We discover this bed, with it’s beautiful large Three Leaf Clover castings, in a predominantly Irish neighborhood of Chicago.
Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine, in Ireland, killed over a million men, women and children and caused another million to flee the country. Many of those fortunate enough to have escaped one of the most devastating famines in history, settled in Chicago. Which at the time was only 8 years old with a population of only 6000, …..giving the Irish an opportunity to be a part of and contribute to the growth of Chicago from it’s inception. Steelmills and the development of the railroad were areas of economic development the Irish helped pioneer. So it’s not unusual that symbols of Irish pride and good fortune would find their way into such things as iron beds, that foundries of the time were producing.
This bed is from the mid-1800’s and one of the finer examples of the craftsmanship that small independently owned foundries, of that period, were producing.

If you happen to have an antique iron bed, you might want to check the detailing on it’s castings. Although decorative in nature, they often held more meaning than you might imagine. Numerous floral castings all held certain meaning, as did fruits such a pineapples for hospitality and artichokes symbolize “peace”.

Over the years, I’ve had quite a few people that weren’t crazy about brass on their bed. But back in the 1800′s the manufacturers of iron beds were desperately trying to offer the brass bed market a better, stronger bed, yet still give a touch of the then popular “brass trim”. With brass the public was limited to one look… one color…..one feel. Metal beds offered a stronger more durable framework that didn’t make the noise that was inherent in brass beds. Because all the points of connecting one rod to another or one tube to another were cast together, there was no friction when there was movement in the bed…….hence….no noise. All of the connecting points on a brass bed were with screws and small brass balls that had to be continually tightened.

Iron beds also offered the public the ability to determine what color they wanted in their room. No longer were they stuck with the boring look of all brass. Most manufacturers offered any color you could show they. Because a bed had to be painted to preserve the iron, it didn’t matter to the manufacturer what color it was. To them it was only important to sell the bedframe…. not get hung up on the color. Although the majority of people think iron beds were mostly painted white, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Greens, blues , reds and black were very popular colors back in the 1800′s. The majority of beds still being found today have dozens of coats and colors of paint on them. Even “two tone” combinations were popular back then……. as they are today and with us.

But occasionally a buyer would love the design of a bed that happen to have brass on it. But they didn’t want the brass. That also happens to be the case today with decorators and clients alike who’s decor just doesn’t work with brass. When that is the case we are asked to either try and replace the brass with iron tubing or rods, or paint the existing brass. As was the case with the photo you see here.

It’s important, when painting brass to ruff up the brass with either sandpaper ir a very lite sandblasting. When sandblasting, care has to be taken not to over blast or blow through the brass tubing. For the paint to bond properly the brass has to bond with the primer that goes on first. You should always use two thick coats of primer, and be sure they dry adequately before applying the next color you want to see.

If done properly, painted brass can look as natural as the rest of your beautifully restored antique iron bed.

One of the more unique and collectible beds  I’ve come across over the years is one we lovingly refer to as the “Grapes of Wrath”  bed. It’s thought that it was a “commissioned” bed for the owner of a vineyard.  Although rare…….. it wasn’t uncommon for an affluent customer to “commission” a foundry to design and construct a unique “one of a kind”  bed, that would have all the molds distroyed after the pouring of one bed. Some of these “commissioned” beds are priceless. Here is the “Grapes of Wrath” bed and the grape castings that have an incredible amount of detailing.

Ironically enough, this particular bed, that I surmised was designed and built for someone who had something to do with a vineyard or wine………. I ended up selling to a couple that lived in Germany, and owned a vineyard. Although it was a beautiful bed with incredibly detailed castings…….. it’s audience was limited to those who had a strong attraction to “grapes”. Not an design item readily sought.

I hope you’ve found this blog informative . I invite you to revisit my website

www.cathousebeds.com

to answer any and all questions you might have about antique iron beds.

I also invite you to take a look at our company  Face Book page for multiple photo albums on Custom Finishes, Canopy Conversions and a comprehensive “Before & After” King Conversions album.

Cathouse Antique Iron Be#B1BE56